After six weeks of planning, prototyping, building, testing, rebuilding, and even more testing, team 766′s robot was finished on February 20 at 12 am. The robot was designed to play Ultimate Ascent, a competition involving robots throwing disks into goals in order to score points (for a brief overview click here). The robot’s shooting mechanism is […]

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M-A Robotic Team 766 readies its robot to play Ultimate Ascent

by Samantha Parish on March 3, 2013

After six weeks of planning, prototyping, building, testing, rebuilding, and even more testing, team 766′s robot was finished on February 20 at 12 am. The robot was designed to play Ultimate Ascent, a competition involving robots throwing disks into goals in order to score points (for a brief overview click here). The robot’s shooting mechanism is flat surface which the disk falls onto, and then is propelled off of by a wheel, working similarly to this, but with slight modifications to the shape; 766′s is straight along the edges instead of curved. The hopper (the fan shaped part of the robot), stores the disks and feeds them into the shooter one at a time. A combination of gravity and a wheel lets the disk fall into a hole cut out of the hopper, which leads to the shooter. The hopper must manually be reloaded by driving the robot to a feeder station located at the end of the field. For bonus points, the robot can ascend a tower, and 766′s robot is equipped with 10 point hangers to gain the extra points. The hangers can be used by simply driving the robot up the the tower and pushing a button that pulls the robot up. The feature is designed to be quick and efficient so that the team can activate it just as the match ends, allowing them a couple of extra seconds to use to make more goals throughout the match. The climbers can be seen here. The drive team will most likely be comprised of David Reeves, Ryan Mostofi, and Will Fuller. Reeves will control the robots movement around the field; Mostofi will be the box operator, controlling the feeder, shooter, and climber; and Fuller will act as the coach, telling the others what is happening with the other robots and what course of action they should take, allowing the other team members to focus on controlling the robot. M-A student Samantha Parish writes for M-A Bear News, where this article originally appeared; used with permission Photo by Will Fuller

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