Science

Post image for SLAC lecture on October 3rd examines beginning of time from remote places

Viewing the Beginning of Time from the Most Remote Places on Earth is the title of lecture being given by SLAC/KIPAC scientist Zeeshan Ahmed (pictured) on Tuesday, October 3, 2017 at 7:30 pm. The free lecture will be held at the Panofsky Auditorium (the Science and User Support Building) on the SLAC campus. Registration is not required.

Shortly after the birth of the universe, space was filled by a plasma that was literally red-hot. The light radiated by that plasma has traveled the vast emptiness of space for billions of years, with the expansion of the universe slowly stretching its waves until today it appears as microwave radiation.

This is the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), a glow still visible in the night sky. This glow is almost uniform, but small variations from point to point hold information about the conditions of the universe 13.8 billion years ago.

This lecture will introduce the CMB, present the sophisticated cameras we build to observe it, and describe the remote outposts of our planet where we deploy these cameras to take pictures of this faint radiation. As we image the CMB in finer and finer detail, we hope to improve our understanding of the beginning of the universe and perhaps of time itself.

Zeeshan Ahmed is an observational cosmologist at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He received his PhD from Caltech in 2012 and held a postdoctoral position at Stanford University before being appointed a Panofsky Fellow at SLAC in 2015. This year, Ahmed was a recipient of the U.S. Department of Energy’s prestigious Early Career Award.

 

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“What’s in a species name” is topic of USGS lecture on Sept. 28

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John B. French, Jr., Center Director USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center will discuss: What have museum collections taught us about invasive diseases? When is an endangered species not a species? How can birds in a museum help protect airline passengers? How do geology and biology govern what species we find on the Channel Islands? The […]

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Science Night returns to the Menlo Park Library on Sept. 28

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On Thursday, September 28, the Menlo Park Library will be hosting its fifth Science Night for adults, teens, and elementary school-aged children. Displays and hands-on activities will be hosted by organizations including Children’s Discovery Museum, Aquarium of the Bay, Science Made Fun, San Francisco Zoo, SETI Institute, MVCode,Tech Rocks and the M-A Robotics team. Attendees […]

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“Roving on Mars” is next USGS lecture on Aug. 30

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The eclipse itself – and more photos of Menlo Park viewers

Thumbnail image for The eclipse itself – and more photos of Menlo Park viewers

InMenlo contributing photographer Scott R. Kline took photos of the eclipse today (above) viewed from Menlo Park. He explains: “I used my Canon 5D Mkii. I had the camera on screen-view mode so I was not looking through the lens, but rather at the screen. I put a 3x neutral density filter on the 24-105mm […]

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People gather at Menlo Park Library to watch the partial eclipse

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InMenlo contributing photographer Robb Most was at the Menlo Park Library this morning where hundreds of people were on hand to view the partial eclipse of the sun that peaked at around 10:15 am. “I talked to Sergeant Mathew Ortega of the Menlo Park Police Department who said that 320 glasses were distributed,” reported Robb. […]

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Stanford researchers find similar characteristics in human-induced and natural earthquakes

Thumbnail image for Stanford researchers find similar characteristics in human-induced and natural earthquakes

Editor’s note: We depart today from our usual community-focused approach to what’s going on locally, for an interesting read from our neighbor to the south, Stanford. It covers a topic – earthquakes – that’s getting a lot of chatter on the various Nextdoor neighborhood sites in Menlo Park. Whether an earthquake occurs naturally or as a […]

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SLAC and Stanford continue partnership that results in innovative research

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SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University will continue their partnership for another five years thanks to a five-year contract extension from the U.S. Department of Energy. Stanford has operated SLAC – originally known as the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center – since its founding in 1962. “At SLAC, we are very fortunate to combine the best of both […]

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“Flares and Fireworks from Black Holes” is topic of SLAC public lecture on July 25

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Black holes are some of the most exotic and extreme objects in the universe. Though they sound like the stuff of science fiction, they are real and much more common than you might think. Every galaxy has a black hole lurking at its center! These black holes are not actually black, because matter falling into […]

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The Effects of Climate Change is topic of USGS evening lecture on June 22

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USGS (Scientist Emeritus) Tom Suchanek will examine: – The frequency of extreme and unpredictable weather events is increasing. – What are the effects of an increase or decrease in carbon emissions? – What is scientific research projecting for the future of climate change? The free public lecture will take place on June 22, 2017, at 7:00 […]

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USGS evening public lecture on May 25 focuses on Hayward Fault Zone

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USGS research geophysicist Janet Watt will give a talk titled Underwater Secrets of the Hayward Fault Zone on Thursday, May 25 at 7:00 pm. The free and open to the pubic lecture will be given at Rambo Auditorium/Bldg. 3, 345 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park.

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