SLAC public lecture

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Black holes are some of the most exotic and extreme objects in the universe. Though they sound like the stuff of science fiction, they are real and much more common than you might think. Every galaxy has a black hole lurking at its center!

These black holes are not actually black, because matter falling into black holes liberates energy that can power some of the brightest objects we see in the night sky. In a lecture by Dan Wilkins on Tuesday, July 25, from 7:30 t 8:30 pm in Panofsky Auditorium at SLAC in Menlo Park (2575 Sand Hill Road), you will find out exactly what a black hole is, how we can find them, and how they can flare intensely — giving rise to impressive firework displays and launching vast jets of plasma at close to the speed of light.

Wilkins is an astrophysicist in the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC) at Stanford University and SLAC. He received his PhD from the University of Cambridge in 2013. He held a postdoctoral position in Halifax, Nova Scotia, under a fellowship from the Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics. In 2016, he joined KIPAC as an NASA-supported Einstein Fellow. Wilkins works on both observational and theoretical aspects of black hole physics.

Registration is not required for this free, public lecture; seating is on a first-come-first-served basis

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“The Dark Universe Through Einstein’s Lens” is July 23 SLAC Public Lecture in Menlo Park

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Debbie Bard, a staff scientist at SLAC in Menlo Park and a member of the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophyics and Cosmology, will deliver the SLAC Public Lecture, “The Dark Universe Through Einstein’s Lens,”on July 23 from 7:30 to 8;30 pm. One of the most surprising predictions made by Einstein’s theory of relativity is that […]

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“Quantum Lightswitch” is topic of SLAC public lecture on Jan. 29

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Joshua Turner, a staff scientist at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser, will deliver the Jan. 29 SLAC Public Lecture, “Quantum Lightswitch: A New Direction in Ultrafast Electronics.” Turner’s talk begins at 7:30 p.m. in SLAC’s Panofsky Auditorium and will highlight research in manipulating atoms’ electrons that could revolutionize computer data storage and retrieval. […]

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Shocking aftermath of supernova explosions is topic of SLAC public lecture on Nov. 27

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Yasunobu Uchiyama, a scientist with the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at SLAC in Menlo Park, will deliver the Nov. 27 SLAC Public Lecture, “Supernova Shock Waves: Powerhouses of the Galaxy.” Uchiyama’s talk begins at 7:30 p.m. in Panofsky Auditorium and will highlight the powerful remnants of exploding stars, called supernovae, which are […]

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How synchrotron-generated X-rays saved one of King Henry VIII’s warships is SLAC public lecture on Oct. 2

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Ritimukta Sarangi, staff scientist in the Structural Molecular Biology group at SSRL, a subdivision of SLAC, will deliver the Oct. 2 SLAC Public Lecture, “Saving the Mary Rose: Synchrotrons and the Preservation of a Tudor Warship.” Sarangi’s talk, which begins at 7:30 p.m. in Panofsky Auditorium, will explain how synchrotron-generated X-rays were used to help […]

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“In the Shadow of HIGGS” is SLAC lecture on July 31

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This has been an exciting summer for particle physicists who have collectively spent the last 40 years hunting for the Higgs boson. Last year, ATLAS and CMS, the two largest experiments analyzing collisions produced by the Large Hadron Collider, observed tantalizing hints of this elusive particle. On July 4th, the two collaborations unveiled their latest […]

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“Magnetic Movies: Watching Computer Bits Dance” is SLAC public lecture on May 22

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Bill Schlotter, an instrument scientist at the Linac Coherent Light Source, will deliver the May 22 SLAC Public Lecture, “Magnetic Movies: Watching Computer Bits Dance.” His talk on Tuesday, beginning at 7:30 p.m. in Panofsky Auditorium, will describe how scientists use SLAC’s powerful X-ray laser to make stop-action movies of the magnetic storage bits that […]

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Learn all about the largest scientific instrument ever built

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Scientists at CERN in Geneva, Switzerland, are using the largest scientific instrument ever built – the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) – to study particles more than a million times smaller than a speck of dust. You can find out why tonight (11/30) at a public lecture beginning at 7:30 pm at SLAC’s Panofsky Auditorium. For […]

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