Because lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are now too heavy and expensive to allow mass-market adoption of light-vehicle electrification, battery chemistries “beyond Li-ion” are now actively being explored, according to IBM research consultant Alan Luntz, who will deliver the April 30 SLAC Colloquium, “Beyond Li-ion: The hope, hype and reality of non-aqueous Li-air batteries.” “Li-air” is short […]

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April 30 SLAC colloquium on lithium-air batteries

by Contributed Content on April 27, 2012

Because lithium-ion (Li-ion) batteries are now too heavy and expensive to allow mass-market adoption of light-vehicle electrification, battery chemistries “beyond Li-ion” are now actively being explored, according to IBM research consultant Alan Luntz, who will deliver the April 30 SLAC Colloquium, "Beyond Li-ion: The hope, hype and reality of non-aqueous Li-air batteries." "Li-air" is short for lithium-air batteries, which have emerged as a favored source of power. Luntz, a consulting professor of photon science at SLAC, will discuss how work with Li-air batteries has exploded over the last two years – from a backwater academic discipline to a major research focus – with more than 50 different companies, university groups and Department of Energy laboratories participating. After a brief introduction of this activity's evolution, Luntz will focus on the fundamental science questions that must ultimately be answered affirmatively if Li-air batteries are to prove viable. The talk will also place some emphasis on the synergy between experimental studies at the IBM Almaden Research Laboratory and theoretical studies at SLAC's Center for Sustainable Energy through Catalysis (SUNCAT). In addition to consulting for the Almaden Research Lab, Luntz has taught in Denmark and throughout Europe, been a visiting scholar at Stanford and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. His talk on Monday begins at 4:15 p.m. in Panofsky Auditorium, with refreshments served beforehand at 3:45 p.m. SLAC colloquia are intended for a general audience and are free and open to the public.

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